Posts Tagged ‘the enchantments’

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And no…. I’ve never explored The Enchantments. There are outdoorsy people and then there are people who like to drink Arnold Palmers on outdoor patios. These are not one in the same. Thank goodness for the next of my family generation who love the great outdoors! Not that I don’t love the great outdoors. I do! Just not in a rugged, camping, put up with no showers or commodes sort of way.

As my children and their families have been sharing spectacular photos such as these, I’ve been re-thinking my aversion to outdoor ruggedness and perhaps regretting that we were not such a family when my children were growing up. While beautiful, pictures are not quite the same as actually being there. Alas! That decision has come and gone and the consequences of which I must pay the price, as it’s not too likely that Nana is going on a rugged hike anytime soon. And the likelihood lessens with the passing of each new year.

So, in looking at the pictures above, I have more than a few tearful regrets!!

Since it’s a fool’s errand to dwell upon what might have been…. I got caught up in the beauty and lore of the Larch tree. Did a bit of looking into it and became fascinated with this unique tree of distinction. Of course, my first insights lured me straight to poetry.

Longfellow’s Hiawatha used Larch/Tamarack roots to lash his canoe.

Hiawatha pleads with the Larch…

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In Longfellow’s epic poem, he personifies the Larch as it shivers, sighs, touches Hiawatha’s forehead with its needles (tassels) and speaks to him, offering up all its roots for the making of his canoe.

What an awesome beginning to getting to know the stately Larch tree! Makes you want to reach out and touch ‘his majesty’ while thanking it for befriending and sharing its very foundation with Hiawatha.

As a matter of fact, in Europe, the Larch is cherished as a decorative tree as well as one that is incredibly functional. The city of Venice, Italy, is built almost exclusively of Larch wood.

So… ‘why an oddball?’ you may ask.

The annual larch needle drop.

Doesn’t it know that conifers are supposed to be evergreen?

What makes the Larch an oddball is that it is one of the rare coniferous trees that drops its needles each fall right along with the maples and oaks. In fact, before Larch needles fall off, they turn bright yellow, adding to the spectacle of fall colors here in the mountainous Pacific Northwest. And then every Larch becomes as bare as any beech or birch.

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